Cinema (uhh…) Media Sounds #16: The Work of JUDE MC
Jude MC gives us a psychedelic landscape that just might be the embodiment of JR Brown and Nora N. Khan’s modular youth: “falsifying, crystallizing myths through modern media and technology. They slide fluidly between references to industrial, post-industrial and digital culture because they can, because this movement is the function of privilege.”
Jude MC has worked with musicians like Blood Orange, Physical Therapy, Fatima Al Qadiri, and (most recently) Mykki Blanco, where the mixture of anime, throwback CG, and video game aesthetics perfectly complement one another.  

Cinema (uhh…) Media Sounds #16: The Work of JUDE MC

Jude MC gives us a psychedelic landscape that just might be the embodiment of JR Brown and Nora N. Khan’s modular youth: “falsifying, crystallizing myths through modern media and technology. They slide fluidly between references to industrial, post-industrial and digital culture because they can, because this movement is the function of privilege.”

Jude MC has worked with musicians like Blood Orange, Physical Therapy, Fatima Al Qadiri, and (most recently) Mykki Blanco, where the mixture of anime, throwback CG, and video game aesthetics perfectly complement one another.  

Morten Tyldum’s The Imitation Game has brought home the People’s Choice award at this year’s Toronto Film Festival. Birds have been saying the biopic downplays British mathematician and pioneering computer scientist, Alan Turing’s homosexuality.
We won’t draw any conclusions until we see it. But until then, check out Jacob  Gaboury’s “A Queer History of Computing” (prt1 & prt2) for an elaboration on this often neglected, erased, or forgotten about part of history. 

Morten Tyldum’s The Imitation Game has brought home the People’s Choice award at this year’s Toronto Film Festival. Birds have been saying the biopic downplays British mathematician and pioneering computer scientist, Alan Turing’s homosexuality.

We won’t draw any conclusions until we see it. But until then, check out Jacob  Gaboury’s “A Queer History of Computing” (prt1 & prt2) for an elaboration on this often neglected, erased, or forgotten about part of history. 



"We shouldn’t be afraid of difficult films, we shouldn’t be afraid not to be entertained. The viewer pays a high price for a film. And not in money. Viewers spend their time, a piece of their lives–an hour and a half to two hours. A bad film, an aggressive film, takes several centuries of life from humanity."

-Aleksandr Sokurov, Interview with Edward Guthman, The San Francisco Chronicle, February 2, 2003

"We shouldn’t be afraid of difficult films, we shouldn’t be afraid not to be entertained. The viewer pays a high price for a film. And not in money. Viewers spend their time, a piece of their lives–an hour and a half to two hours. A bad film, an aggressive film, takes several centuries of life from humanity."

-Aleksandr Sokurov, Interview with Edward Guthman, The San Francisco Chronicle, February 2, 2003

Delta     |     Kornél Mundruczó    |    2008

Check it: mirrorimagestills, a Tumblr run by throwherinthewater and batarde, cataloging occurrences of mirrors in film.

Check it: mirrorimagestills, a Tumblr run by throwherinthewater and batarde, cataloging occurrences of mirrors in film.

Facets Presents STARRED UP, David Mackenzie’s smash hit (get it?) from September 5 thru 11!

Facets Presents STARRED UP, David Mackenzie’s smash hit (get it?) from September 5 thru 11!

Dust Devil - Richard Stanley - 1993

Samsara - Ron Fricke - 2011

the-hulot-universe:

Standing - Robert Mulligan, William Wyler, George Cukor, Robert Wise, Jean-Claude Carrière and Serge Silberman.

Sitting - Billy Wilder, George Stevens, Luis Buñuel, Alfred Hitchcock and Rouben Mamoulian.

At Cukor’s house, photo from 1972 

One person in this mastershot is still alive…#Jean-Claude Carrière
(picture source: A Certain Cinema)

A story behind this wonderful picture (Jean-Claude Carrière—“I am the only one from this picture still alive”—gave his own account in the Telegraph)…
Two years after Tristana, the 72-year-old director was in Los Angeles to present his next film, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, at the L.A. Film Festival, and George Cukor, whom he had never met before, invited him to a lunch in his honor with “a few old friends” at his home in Bel Air. Until they arrived, Buñuel and Carrière had no idea that the guests would include the pantheon of Hollywood filmmaking. Carrière himself had the good sense to call up a photographer and document the gathering, which included (clockwise from top left) Robert Mulligan (Buñuel describes him as “a young director named Robert Mulligan” though he would have been 47 at the time), William Wyler, George Cukor, Robert Wise, Carrière, Buñuel’s producer Serge Silberman, Rouben Mamoulian, Alfred Hitchcock, Buñuel, George Stevens and Billy Wilder. And if that wasn’t enough, the space between Carrière and Silberman was left to represent John Ford, who had been at the lunch (Buñuel writes “we were the first to arrive at Cukor’s magnificent house, followed close behind by a large, muscular black man half-carrying an elderly gentleman with a patch over one eye. To my surprise, it was John Ford”) but didn’t stay long because of illness (he died the following year). What we wouldn’t all give to be at that lunch.

#JIROdreamsofsushi 

bardotinmotion:

The many faces of Brigitte Bardot in Godard’s 1963 masterpiece, Le Mepris.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

brightwalldarkroom:

image

I LOVE YOU, BUT YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT.

by Brianna Ashby

After seeing Moonrise Kingdom, my brother-in-law wrote to say that Suzy Bishop reminded him of the way he imagined me as a young lady. I was flattered that anyone would ever conceive of me as a possible part of…

threedollarhooker:

Cinema  |  Film

The Night of the Hunter, 1955 directed by Charles Laughton.

lottereinigerforever:

On the set of “Seconds”